Essential books for a photo library part II

This is the book list for your photo library continued...

51. Alfred Stieglitz. Camera Work

American pioneer Alfred Stieglitz defined early 20th-century photography, creating the school of "Photo Secessionism" and founding cult art, literature, and avant-garde photo journal Camera Work. This beautiful book reproduces the entire 50-issue run, originally published between 1903 and 1917-a benchmark of photography as art form.





52. Eugène Atget. Paris


Take an intimate promenade through Paris with some 500 images from Eugène Atget, the flâneur photographer who excelled in city “documents.” Down main streets and side streets, through courtyards, arcades, and the city’s 20 arrondissements, we find a unique portrait of a beloved cityand the making of a photographic master, hailed by Man Ray, Berenice Abbott, Walker Evans, and beyond.



53. Lewis W. Hine. America at Work

Photographer, teacher, and sociologist Lewis W. Hine (1874–1940) shaped our consciousness of American working life in the early 20th century like no other. Combining his training as an educator with his humanist concerns, Hine was one of the earliest photographers to use the camera as a documentary tool, capturing in particular labor conditions, housing, and immigrants arriving on Ellis Island. His images, including those of children in cotton mills, factories, coal mines, and fields, became icons of photographic history that helped to transform labor laws in the United States.

This book brings together a representative collection of Lewis W. Hine’s photography from all periods of his work. It spans his earliest forays into social-documentary work through to his more artistic and interpretative late photographs, including his phenomenal images of the construction of the Empire State Building and his symbiotic staging of human and machine as a comment on increasing industrialization. Alongside the near 350 photographs, the book includes an essay by the editor, introducing Hine’s life and pioneering work.



54. Peter Lindbergh. Untold Stories

The first-ever exhibition curated by Peter Lindbergh himself, shortly before his untimely death, Untold Stories at the Düsseldorf Kunstpalast served as a blank canvas for the photographer’s unrestrained vision and creativity. Given total artistic freedom, Lindbergh curated an uncompromising collection that sheds an unexpected light on his colossal oeuvre. This artist's book, the official companion to the landmark exhibition, offers an extensive, firsthand look at the highly personal collection. When it came to printing his photos, Lindbergh chose a special uncoated paper – a thin sheet with a soft, open surface – as a deliberate aesthetic statement.

Renowned the world over, Lindbergh’s images have left an indelible mark on contemporary culture and photo history. Here, the photographer experiments with his own oeuvre and narrates new stories while staying true to his lexicon. In both emblematic and never-before-seen images, he challenges his own icons and presents intimate moments shared with personalities who had been close to him for years, including Nicole Kidman, Uma Thurman, Robin Wright, Jessica Chastain, Jeanne Moreau, Naomi Campbell, Charlotte Rampling and many more.

This XL volume presents more than 150 photographs―many of them unpublished or short-lived, often having been commissioned by monthly fashion magazines such as Vogue, Harper’s Bazaar, Interview, Rolling Stone, W Magazine, or The Wall Street Journal. An extensive conversation between Lindbergh and Kunstpalast director Felix Krämer, as well as an homage by close friend Wim Wenders, offer fresh insights into the making of the collection. The result is an intimate personal statement by Lindbergh about his work.



55. Annie Leibovitz. The Early Years. 1970–1983

For more than half a century, Annie Leibovitz has been taking culture-defining photographs. Her portraits of politicians, performers, athletes, businesspeople, and royalty make up a gallery of our time, imprinted on our collective consciousness by both the singularity of their subjects and Leibovitz’s inimitable style.

The catalogue to an installation at the LUMA Foundation in Arles, France, Annie Leibovitz: The Early Years, 1970–1983 returns to Leibovitz’s origins. It begins with a moment of artistic revelation: the spontaneous shot that made Leibovitz think she could transition from painting to photography as her area of study at the San Francisco Art Institute. The meticulously and personally curated collection, including contact sheets and Polaroids, provides a vivid document both of Leibovitz’s development as a young artist and of a pivotal era.

Leibovitz’s reportage-like photo stories for Rolling Stone, which she began working for when she was still a student, record such heady political, cultural, and counter-cultural developments as the Vietnam War protests, the launch of Apollo 17, the presidential campaign of 1972, Richard Nixon’s resignation in 1974, and the Rolling Stones on tour in 1975. Then, as now, Leibovitz won the trust of the prominent and famous, and the book’s pages are animated by many familiar faces, among them Muhammad Ali, Mick Jagger, Keith Richards, Ken Kesey, Patti Smith, Bruce Springsteen, Joan Didion, and Debbie Harry, as well as John Lennon and Yoko Ono, captured in their now iconic embrace just hours before Lennon was assassinated.

Throughout the book, the portraits and reportage are linked to images of cars, driving, and even a series on California highway patrolmen. In many ways, it’s a celebration of life on the road―the frenetic rhythms, the chance encounters, the meditative opportunities. And with its rich archival aspects, it is also a tribute to an earlier time and a young photographer enmeshed in a culture that was itself in transition.





56. Stanley Kubrick Photographs. Through a Different Lens


In 1945, at just 17 years old, Stanley Kubrick became a staff photographer for Lookmagazine. His humanist slice-of-life features celebrate his native New York City and already reveal a burgeoning creative genius. With around 300 images, many previously unseen, as well as rare Look magazine tear sheets, this release coincides with a major show at the Museum of the City of New York and includes an introduction by noted photography critic Luc Sante.



57. BYWAYS. Photographs by Roger A Deakins

Portraits and landscapes from the cinematographer famed for his work with Sam Mendes and the Coen brothers


This is the first monograph by the legendary Oscar-winning cinematographer Sir Roger Deakins, best known for his collaborations with directors such as the Coen brothers, Sam Mendes and Denis Villeneuve. It includes previously unpublished black-and-white photographs spanning five decades, from 1971 to the present. After graduating from college Deakins spent a year photographing life in rural North Devon, in South West England, on a commission for the Beaford Arts Centre; these images are gathered here for the first time and attest to a keenly ironic English sensibility, also documenting a vanished postwar Britain. A second suite of images expresses Deakins’ love of the seaside. Traveling for his cinematic work has allowed Deakins to photograph landscapes all over the world; in this third group of images, that same irony remains evident.



58. Harry Gruyaert

Born in Antwerp in 1941, Harry Gruyaert was one of the first European photographers to explore the creative potential of colour in the 1970s and 1980s. This book brings together his best work, including images from his renowned 1972 series TV Shots and the later Made in Belgium, in one beautifully produced volume. Influenced by such American photographers as Saul Leiter, Joel Meyerowitz, Stephen Shore and William Eggleston, as well as by cinema, Gruyaert’s work defined new territory for colour photography: an emotive, non-narrative and boldly graphic way of perceiving the world. His photographs are autonomous and self-sufficient, often independent from any context or thematic logic. A member of Magnum Photos since 1982, he has embraced the possibilities of digital photography in his most recent work, feeling that it allows him to take more risks and capture new kinds of light.



59. Saul Leiter: 0 (Photofile)

Saul Leiter is one of four new titles published this September in Thames & Hudson’s acclaimed ‘Photofile’ series. Each book brings together the best work of the world’s greatest photographers in an attractive format and at an easily affordable price. Hailed by The Times as ‘finely produced’, the books are printed to the highest standards. Each one contains some sixty full-page reproductions, together with a critical introduction and a full bibliography.


60. Ernst Haas: New York in Colour, 1952-1962

Ernst Haas's colour works reveal the photographer's remarkable genius and remind us on every page why we love New York. When Haas moved from Vienna to New York City in 1951, he left behind a war-torn continent and a career producing black-and-white images. For Haas, the new medium of colour photography was the only way to capture a city pulsing with energy and humanity. These images demonstrate Haas's tremendous virtuosity and confidence with Kodachrome film and the technical challenges of colour printing. Unparalleled in their depth and richness of colour, brimming with lyricism and dramatic tension, these images reveal a photographer at the height of his career.



61. Steve McCurry: A Life in Pictures

The biggest and most comprehensive volume on Steve McCurry published to date and the final word on forty years of McCurry’s incredible work. Written and compiled by Bonnie McCurry, Steve’s sister and President of the McCurry Foundation, Steve McCurry: A Life in Pictures is the ultimate book of McCurry’s images and his approach to photography.


The book brings together all of McCurry’s key adventures and influences, from his very first journalistic images taken in the aftermath of the 1977 Johnstown floods, to his breakthrough journey into Afghanistan hidden among the mujahideen, his many travels across India and Pakistan, his coverage of the destruction of the 1991 Gulf War and the September 11th terrorist attacks in New York, up to his most-recent work. Totalling over 350 images, the selection of photographs includes his best-known shots as well as over 100 previously unpublished images. Also included are personal notes, telegrams and visual ephemera from his travels and assignments, all accompanied by Bonnie McCurry’s authoritative text – drawn from her unique relationship with Steve – as well as reflections from many of Steve’s friends and colleagues.



62. Bruce Gilden: Cherry Blossom

Bruce Gilden first set foot in Japan in 1994. On that trip and subsequent others, he explored the meandering streets of a country that had long fascinated him. From Tokyo to Osaka, he laid Japan bare in his own inimitable photographic style. Each image is a very close and powerful encounter with a story behind it. As ever, Gilden makes his approach, talks, tells stories, takes photographs, and paints a portrait of a unique street scene. In search of personalities as strong as his own, Gilden drew on the details around him to transcribe his vision of Japan: one man’s suit, another’s hat, or a woman’s posture. All of these elements, which give strength to the images, form a captivating ensemble – on the margins, just like him.


In Cherry Blossom, Gilden tells the story of these voyages and the ties he maintains with Japan in a rare introductory text. The stories told alongside these pictures – whether an anecdote or a dialogue with their characters – render the American photographer’s vision even more contemporary than ever.



63. Facing New York by Bruce Gilden

'The cast of characters in Bruce Gilden's theatre of the street is outrageous. Sometimes tawdry and out of this world, they are mostly mysterious. To Gilden and his fellow New Yorkers, they're just neighbours. In broad and simple terms, and with great expressive authority, Gilden has captured the uniquely individualistic, self-styled New York personality on the run. In Gilden's world, no-one is on the margins of centre stage, they are all-star players.' - Susan Kismaric Originally published in 1992 by Cornerhouse Publications, the imprint of the Manchester Film & Visual Arts Centre of which Dewi Lewis was Founding Director, 'Facing New York' was Bruce Gilden's first major publication. It has since become a recognised classic but has been out of print for some time. For this new edition Bruce has replaced two images, of which he says that he just can't understand why they didn't make his original selection. Bruce Gilden has always had a fascination with what he calls 'characters'. So, for Bruce, New York, with its famously idiosyncratic citizenry and the unique energy of its streets, proved to be a giant creative playground. 'Facing New York' sees Bruce and his camera at their highest level of intensity, capturing New Yorkers in moments of utter spontaneity yet still exposing the humanity that lies behind their hardened exteriors.





64. Helen Levitt


Helen Levitt (1913 - 2009) numbers among the foremost exponents of street photography.

As a passionate observer and chronicler of everyday street life in New York, she spent decades documenting residents of the city's poorer neighbourhoods such as Lower East Side and Harlem. Levitt's oeuvre stands out for her sense of dynamics and surrealistic sense of humour, and her employment of colour photography was revolutionary: Levitt numbers among those photographers who pioneered and established colour as a means of artistic expression.

The book accompanying the retrospective of the Albertina Museum features around 130 of her iconic works. These range from her early, surrealism-influenced photographs of chalk drawings to her 1941 photos from Mexico and the clandestinely shot portraits of New York subway passengers that Walker Evans encouraged her to do in 1938. Many of these photos come from Helen Levitt's personal estate, and this exhibition represents their first-ever public showing.



65. Bruce Davidson: Subway

Bruce Davidson's groundbreaking Subway, first published by Aperture in 1986, has garnered critical acclaim both as a documentation of a unique moment in the cultural fabric of New York City and for its phenomenal use of extremes of color and shadow set against flash-lit skin. In Davidson's own words, the people in the subway, their flesh juxtaposed against the graffiti, the penetrating effect of the strobe light itself, and even the hollow darkness of the tunnels, inspired an aesthetic that goes unnoticed by passengers who are trapped underground, hiding behind masks and closed off from each other. In this third edition of what is now a classic of photographic literature, a sequence of 118 (including 25 previously unpublished) images transport the viewer through a landscape at times menacing, and at other times lyrical and soulful. The images present the full gamut of New Yorkers, from weary straphangers and languorous ladies in summer dresses to stalking predators and homeless persons. Davidson's accompanying text tells the story behind the images, clarifying his method and dramatizing his obsession with the subway, its rhythms and its particular madness.



66. Bruce Davidson: Survey

Bruce Davidson is a pioneer of social documentary photography. He began taking photographs at the age of ten and continued to develop his passion at Rochester Institute of Technology and Yale University. Later called upon for military service, Davidson met Henri Cartier-Bresson in France and was introduced to Magnum Photos. In his work, Davidson prizes his relationship to the subject above all else. From his profound documentation of the civil rights movement to his in-depth study of one derelict block in Harlem, he has immersed himself fully in his projects, which have sometimes taken him several years to complete. He once wrote, “I often find myself an outsider on the inside, discovering beauty and meaning in the most desperate of situations.” This survey, created in conjunction with an exhibition at Fundación Mapfre in Spain, focuses on the work that has made Davidson one of the most influential documentary photographers to this day. In addition to his civil rights series and his work in Harlem, the book includes Davidson’s well-known series Brooklyn Gang, Subway, and Central Park. The book also highlights more recent projects, such as his explorations of Paris and Los Angeles landscapes.



67. A Greek Portfolio by Constantine Manos

In the early 1960s, Constantine Manos spent three years living and working as a photographer in Greece. "A Greek Portfolio" represents an impromptu pictorial account of Manos' travels through the country. First published in 1972, it received awards at Arles and at the Leipzig Book Fair, and the limited first edition has since become a sought-after collector's item. Eight previously unpublished images and a new forward enchance this edition.



68. Alex Webb: Istanbul: City of a Hundred Names

In 1998 Alex Webb visited Istanbul and was immediately enthralled by the people, the layers of culture and history, the richness of street life. But what particularly drew him in was a sense of Istanbul as a border city, lying between Europe and Asia. As he writes, “For thirty-some years as a photographer I have been intrigued by borders, places where cultures come together, sometimes easily, sometimes roughly.” He has returned to Istanbul whenever possible, and the resulting body of work―some of Webb’s strongest to date―conveys the frisson of a culture in transition, yet firmly rooted in a complex history.



69. Hiroshi Sugimoto: Portraits

At first glance, Hiroshi Sugimoto’s photographic portrait of King Henry VIII of England is arresting: his camera has captured the tactility of Henry’s luxurious furs and silks, the elaborate embroidery of his doublet, and the light reflecting off of each shimmering jewel. The contours of the king’s face are so lifelike that he appears to be almost three-dimensional. It seems as though the twenty-first-century artist has traveled back in time nearly five hundred years to photograph his royal subject. While Sugimoto’s portraits of historical figures appear to capture a lived moment in time, they are fiction. These portraits are in fact at least twice removed from the subject: his photograph captures a wax figure that has been created by a sculptor from either a photographic portrait or a painted one. Sugimoto has photographed his portraits of historical subjects in black and white, with each “sitter” posed against a black background, giving the images an austere formality. The black backdrop, free of any props or additional visual information, amplifies the illusion that we are viewing a contemporary portrait in which the subject has stepped out of history. Other portraits appear to be photojournalistic. Sugimoto’s image of the Duke of Wellington at Napoleon’s deathbed is actually a photograph of the mise en scene created by the wax museum, but it registers as real in our minds. The portraits of wax figures, which in this volume are presented alongside a handful of portraits of living subjects and photographs of memento mori, call into question what it is the portrait captures. As with his other major bodies of work―Dioramas, Seascapes, Theaters―Sugimoto’s Portraits address the passage of time and history. We recognize these historical figures because of the many contemporaneous drawings, paintings, sculptures, and photographs that have recorded them. We take it for granted that a photograph of a living subject is true, but what does that mean? Are Sugimoto’s portraits of living subjects more “true” than the historical portraits of wax figures? Is Hans Holbein’s painted portrait of Henry VIII truer than Sugimoto’s photograph of the wax figure made from Holbein’s painting?



70. Bill Brandt

With a career spanning nearly half a century, Bill Brandt was a master of several major genres of photography: photojournalism, portraiture, the nude and landscapes. At first glance, Brandt’s genres may appear unrelated, but when analysing his career in its entirety, a common theme comes to the forefront: what psychologist Sigmund Freud and philosopher Eugenio Trías called 'the sinister.' From his earliest photographs taken as an amateur in the 1930s to his late portraits and studies of the female body, Brandt expresses a fascination with the strange and dark aspects of life that only he can reveal.



71. Willy Ronis: The Master Photographer's Unpublished Albums

The definitive reference on master French photographer Willy Ronis, this volume reproduces personal and previously unpublished photo albums of his work that he curated and commentated throughout his career.


A key figure in twentieth-century photography, Willy Ronis conveyed the poetic reality of postwar France in iconic black and white photographs. Influenced by Alfred Steiglitz and Ansel Adams, and amicable with his contemporary Magnum photographers, Ronis was the first French photographer to contribute to Life magazine. In the 1950s, MoMA curator Edward Steichen featured Ronis―along with Henri- Cartier Bresson, Robert Doisneau, and Brassaï― in the groundbreaking exhibitions The Family of Man and Five French Photographers .


Throughout his life, this powerhouse of humanist photography kept meticulous record of his work, curating each era into albums, which are reproduced here for the first time. Timeless photographs of postwar France and its inhabitants are accompanied by the photographer’s original observations and comments, framing the images within their technical and historical context. Photography historian Matthieu Rivallin’s critical perspective adds nuance to the photographer’s notes, and the ensemble is a groundbreaking and definitive reference on the myriad aspects of the artists’ immense career and is an essential volume for all photography aficionados.



72. The Misfits: Chronique d'un Tournage par les Photographes de Magnum

Magnum Photos had obtained the exclusive filming of John Huston's The Misfits with Marilyn Monroe, Clark Gable and Montgomery Clift, from a screenplay by Arthur Miller. The film turned to Reno and the Nevada desert in the summer of 1960. Nine major photographers - Eve Arnold, Cornell Capa, Henri Cartier-Bresson, Bruce Davidson, Elliott Erwitt, Erich Hartmann, Ernst Haas, Inge Morath and Dennis Stock - were thus privileged witnesses of a film in the making. The Misfits was the last screen appearance of Marilyn before her death in 1962. "I wrote this feel good film for Marilyn. At the same time, I'm glad that it was done, because she dreamed of being taken seriously as an actress", said Arthur Miller in an interview with Serge Toubiana. Despite the failures and tragedies (the death of Clark Gable occurred fifteen days after the end of filming), The Misfits became a legendary film, and it is possible to trace the action thanks to Magnum photographs.



73. Josef Koudelka: Ruins

Between 1991 and 2015, Josef Koudelka completed an epic journey across twenty countries bordering the Mediterranean, stopping at over 200 Greek and Roman archaeological sites, relentlessly researching the beauty of the ancient world.


Before the Magnum photographer, nobody had attempted to make such a comprehensive photographic record of these artefacts with so much persistence and so little assistance. In this book, produced in close collaboration with the photographer, Koudelka’s aim was to use art to re-appropriate a world that is escaping us and that we could lose – a world where the mind alternates between reason and faith, law and liberty.



74. Cimarron: Freedom and Masquerade by Charles Fréger

Charles Fréger explores the masks, costumes and characters created by the descendants of Africans and indigenous peoples in the Americas


All across the Americas, from the 16th century onwards, enslaved Africans escaped their captors and struck out on their own. These runaways, having found their freedom, established their own communities or joined with indigenous peoples to forge new identities.


Cimarron, borrowing a Spanish-American term for these fugitive former slaves, is a new series of photographic portraits of their descendants. From Brazil, Colombia, the Caribbean islands and Central America, as far as the southern USA, elaborate masquerades are staged that celebrate and keep alive the memory of African slaves and their descendants. Stock characters are portrayed in costume, or in grotesque or satirical representations. A huge variety of African tribal dress, wild ritual regalia and shimmering Mardi Gras outfits feature in breathtaking succession. Vividly coloured silks and cottons combine with woven fibres, leaves, feathers, and bodypaint; props include emblems of slavery and slavemasters – ropes, sticks, guns and machetes. These photographs record real people whose collective sense of memory, folk history and imagination dramatically challenges our expectations.


Charles Fréger’s work has established a large and growing following among connoisseurs of contemporary photography, defining a new genre of documentary portraiture that extends and deepens our sense of the human past and the present.



75. Henri Cartier-Bresson: China 1948–1949, 1958

The first visual chronicle of a key chapter in Henri Cartier-Bresson's career


Henri Cartier-Bresson traveled to China in December 1948 at the request of Life magazine. He stayed for ten months and captured some of the most spectacular moments in the country’s history, photographing Beijing in ‘the last days of the Kuomintang’ and bearing witness to the new regime’s takeover in Shanghai. Then, in 1958, Cartier-Bresson was one of the first Western photographers to go back to China to record the changes that had taken place over the preceding decade. The ‘picture stories’ he sent to Magnum and Life played a key role in Westerners’ understanding of Chinese political events. Many of these images are among the best-known and most significant photographs in Cartier-Bresson’s oeuvre: his empathy with the populace and sense of responsibility as a witness make them an important part of his legacy.


Henri Cartier-Bresson: China 1948-1949, 1958 allows these photographs to be re-examined along with all of the documents that were preserved: the photographer’s captions and comments, contact sheets and abundant correspondence, as well as the published versions that appeared in both American and European magazines. A welcome addition to any photography lover’s book-shelf, this is an exciting new volume on one of the twentieth century’s most important photographers.



76. Sebastião Salgado: Africa

Sebastiao Salgado is one the most respected photojournalists working today, his reputation forged by decades of dedication and powerful black and white images of dispossessed and distressed people taken in places where most wouldn't dare to go. Although he has photographed throughout South America and around the globe, his work most heavily concentrates on Africa, where he has shot more than 40 reportage works over a period of 30 years. From the Dinka tribes in Sudan and the Himba in Namibia to gorillas and volcanoes in the lakes region to displaced peoples throughout the continent, Salgado shows us all facets of African life today. Whether he's documenting refugees or vast landscapes, Salgado knows exactly how to grab the essence of a moment so that when one sees his images one is involuntarily drawn into them. His images artfully teach us the disastrous effects of war, poverty, disease, and hostile climatic conditions. This book brings together Salgado's photos of Africa in three parts. The first concentrates on the southern part of the continent (Mozambique, Malawi, Angola, Zimbabwe, South Africa, Namibia), the second on the Great Lakes region (Congo, Rwanda, Burundi, Uganda, Tanzania, Kenya), and the third on the Sub-Saharan region (Burkina Faso, Mali, Sudan, Somalia, Chad, Mauritania, Senegal, Ethiopia). Texts are provided by renowned Mozambique novelist Mia Couto, who describes how today's Africa reflects the effects of colonization as well as the consequences of economic, social, and environmental crises. This stunning book is not only a sweeping document of Africa but an homage to the continent's history, people, and natural phenomena.



77. Sebastião Salgado. Gold

“What is it about a dull yellow metal that drives men to abandon their homes, sell their belongings and cross a continent in order to risk life, limbs and sanity for a dream?” – Sebastião Salgado

When Sebastião Salgado was finally authorized to visit Serra Pelada in September 1986, having been blocked for six years by Brazil’s military authorities, he was ill-prepared to take in the extraordinary spectacle that awaited him on this remote hilltop on the edge of the Amazon rainforest. Before him opened a vast hole, some 200 meters wide and deep, teeming with tens of thousands of barely-clothed men. Half of them carried sacks weighing up to 40 kilograms up wooden ladders, the others leaping down muddy slopes back into the cavernous maw. Their bodies and faces were the color of ochre, stained by the iron ore in the earth they had excavated.

After gold was discovered in one of its streams in 1979, Serra Pelada evoked the long-promised El Dorado as the world’s largest open-air gold mine, employing some 50,000 diggers in appalling conditions. Today, Brazil’s wildest gold rush is merely the stuff of legend, kept alive by a few happy memories, many pained regrets―and Sebastião Salgado’s photographs.

Color dominated the glossy pages of magazines when Salgado shot these images. Black and white was a risky path, but the Serra Pelada portfolio would mark a return to the grace of monochrome photography, following a tradition whose masters, from Edward Weston and Brassaï to Robert Capa and Henri Cartier-Bresson, had defined the early and mid-20th century. When Salgado’s images reached The New York Times Magazine, something extraordinary happened: there was complete silence. “In my entire career at The New York Times,” recalled photo editor Peter Howe, “I never saw editors react to any set of pictures as they did to Serra Pelada.”

Today, with photography absorbed by the art world and digital manipulation, Salgado’s portfolio holds a biblical quality and projects an immediacy that makes them vividly contemporary. The mine at Serra Pelada has been long closed, yet the intense drama of the gold rush leaps out of these images.

This book gathers Salgado’s complete Serra Pelada portfolio in museum-quality reproductions, accompanied by a foreword by the photographer and an essay by Alan Riding.



78. Alex Prager: Silver Lake Drive

Alex Prager is one of the truly original image makers of our time. Working fluidly between photography and film, she creates large-scale projects that combine elaborately built sets, highly staged, complex performances and a ‘Hollywood’ aesthetic to produce still and moving images that are familiar yet strange, utterly compelling and unerringly memorable. In her career she has won both popular acclaim and the recognition of the art establishment – her work can be found in the collections of MoMA and the Whitney Museum in New York as well as institutions worldwide.


This book is the first career retrospective of this rising star. In 120 carefully curated photographs, it summarizes Prager’s creative trajectory and offers an ideal introduction for the popular ‘breakout’ audience who may have only recently encountered her work. Structured around her project-orientated approach, Silver Lake Drive presents the very best images from her career to date: from the early Film Stills through her collaborations with the actor Bryce Dallas Howard on Week-end and Despair to the tour de force of Face in the Crowd – shot on a Hollywood sound stage with over 150 performers – and her 2015 commission for the Paris opera La Grande Sortie.


Supported by an international exhibition schedule, and including an in-depth interview with Alex Prager by Nathalie Herschdorfer and supplementary essays by the curators of renowned museums and galleries, this book will be an essential addition to the collection of anyone who has followed Prager’s career and all with an interest in and appreciation of contemporary art.



79. Susan Meiselas: Carnival Strippers Revisited

This is the new and expanded edition of Susan Meiselas’ 1976 book Carnival Strippers, arguably one of the most important photographic projects of the second half of the twentieth century.


From 1972 to 1975, Meiselas spent her summers photographing women who performed striptease for small-town carnivals in New England, Pennsylvania and South Carolina. As she followed the shows from town to town, she captured the dancers on stage and off, their public performances as well as private lives, creating a portrait both documentary and empathetic: “The recognition of this world is not the invention of it. I wanted to present an account of the girl show that portrayed what I saw and revealed how the people involved felt about what they were doing.” Meiselas also taped candid interviews with the dancers, their boyfriends, the show managers and paying customers, which form a crucial part of the book.


Meiselas’ frank description of these women brought a hidden world to public attention, and explored the complex role the carnival played in their lives: mobility, money and liberation, but also undeniable objectification and exploitation. Produced during the early years of the women’s movement, Carnival Strippers reflects the struggle for identity and self-esteem that characterized a complex era of change. Featuring largely unpublished additional photos, contact sheets and letters in its Making of Volume, Carnival Strippers Revisited gives new depth to Meiselas’ influential vision.



80. Susan Meiselas: On the Frontline

In On the Frontline, one of the most influential photographers of our time, Susan Meiselas, provides an insightful personal commentary on the trajectory of her career--on her ideas and processes, and her decisions as a photographer. Applying a sociological training to the practice of witness journalism, she compares her process to that of an archaeologist, piecing together shards of evidence to build a three-dimensional cultural understanding of her subjects.

Meiselas achieved worldwide recognition for her photographic coverage of the Nicaraguan Revolution in 1979--first published in 1981 and now regarded as a seminal work of journalism--which followed her exploration of the experience of women on the carnival entertainment circuit, Carnival Strippers (1976). She went on to spend five years exploring and creating a new visual history of the Kurdish people, published as Kurdistan: In the Shadow of History (1997). In On the Frontline, she guides us through the thinking behind each, and many other projects besides, as well as her influential involvement in Magnum Photos as one of its earliest women members. One of the greatest contributors to the evolution of documentary storytelling, Meiselas here offers a compelling insight into her journey as a photographer and thinker.



81. Susan Meiselas: Nicaragua: June 1978 - July 1979

Originally published in 1981, Susan Meiselas’s Nicaragua is a contemporary classic―a seminal contribution to the literature of concerned photojournalism. Nicaragua forms an extraordinary narrative of a nation in turmoil. Starting with a powerful and chilling evocation of the Somoza regime during its decline in the late 1970s, the images trace the evolution of the popular resistance that led to the insurrection, culminating with the triumph of the Sandinista revolution in 1979. The book includes interviews of various participants in the revolution, along with letters, poems, and statistics. Excerpts from these interviews, gathered during Meiselas’s return to Nicaragua in early 1981, accompany the plates in the book. In 2008, on the thirtieth anniversary of the popular insurrection, and of Meiselas’s first trip to Nicaragua, Aperture published a new edition. Now, as the fortieth anniversary approaches, Aperture is pleased to reissue the book with an augmented reality (AR) function, bringing a selection of images to life via clips from Meiselas’s films Pictures from a Revolution (1991), in which she returns to the scenes she originally photographed, tracking down subjects and interviewing them, and Reframing History (2004), a documentation of her return in 2004 with nineteen mural-sized images of her photographs from 1979, to collaborate with local communities to create sites for collective memory. A conversation with Kristen Lubben addresses the history of Meiselas’s work in Nicaragua, how it has been circulated, revisited, repatriated, and reconsidered―how and why it endures. Expanding upon this, they discuss the new layered content experience of AR in this edition, which takes the reader beyond still photography into a world of video and sound.



82. The Altering Eye: Photographs from the National Gallery of Art

In 1949 Georgia O’Keeffe chose the National Gallery of Art as the custodian of nearly 1,600 photographs by Alfred Stieglitz – the Key Set, as it has become known. With the formation in 1990 of the Gallery’s department of photographs under Sarah Greenough, the collection has grown to 14,000 works of art, an assemblage that both charts the development of the medium and reveals the beauty and dynamic versatility of photography over its course of more than 175 years. This elegant book presents some of the most significant and compelling photographs acquired over the years, ranging from experimental photographs made in the earliest years of the medium’s history to key works by major twentieth-century figures and contemporary pieces that reset the ways in which photography shapes our experience of the modern world. The guides on this enlightening walk through the history of the medium are members of the extraordinary curatorial team that established the National Gallery’s international reputation for photography exhibitions and publications over the past twenty-five years, ever advancing the recognition of photography as a fine art.



83. Man Ray

An exciting monograph dedicated to an extraordinary figure and one of last century’s most famous and influential artists. Man Ray (1890-1976) was a photographer, painter, and creator of objects, experimental films and images which were at times enigmatic. This catalogue, which presents more than 200 works and compares and contrasts images with biographical details, enables the reader to grasp the creative process involved in each work and reveals the mechanisms and motivating sources of the artist’s inexhaustible imagination.



84. Sally Mann: Immediate Family

First published in 1992, Immediate Family has been lauded by critics as one of the great photography books of our time, and among the most influential. Taken against the Arcadian backdrop of her woodland summer home in Virginia, Sally Mann’s extraordinary, intimate photographs of her children reveal truths that embody the individuality of her own family yet ultimately take on a universal quality. With sublime dignity, acute wit, and feral grace, Sally Mann’s pictures explore the eternal struggle between the child’s simultaneous dependence and quest for autonomy―the holding on and the breaking away. This is the stuff of which Greek dramas are made: impatience, terror, self-discovery, self-doubt, pain, vulnerability, role-playing, and a sense of immortality, all of which converge in these astonishing photographs. This reissue of Immediate Family has been printed using new scans and separations from Mann’s original prints, which were taken with an 8-by-10-inch view camera, rendering them with a freshness and sumptuousness true to the original edition.



85. Guy Bourdin: A Message for You

With the eye of a painter, Guy Bourdin created images that contained fascinating stories, compositions and colors. He radically broke conventions of commercial photography with a relentless perfectionism and sharp humor. Famed for his suggestive narratives and surreal aesthetics, Bourdin used fashion photography to explore the realm between the absurd and the sublime. Now in its third edition, A Message for You is a road trip through Bourdin’s visual landscape, a collage of images that maps his artistic search and vision. The texts, Polaroids, poems, sketches and contact sheets unfold in real time through the memories of model Nicolle Meyer, a muse to Bourdin. Given total creative freedom and with an uncompromising artistic ethic, Bourdin captured the imagination of a whole generation. The late 1970s, recognized as the pinnacle of his career, are the focus of this monograph, which is the last of eight books exploring his most outstanding and undiscovered work so far.



86. Guy Bourdin: Untouched

Guy Bourdin was a groundbreaking image-maker and undoubtedly one of the most influential fashion photographers of the twentieth century. Intriguing and revolutionary, his work has achieved a cult-like following; the striking use of color, suggestive narratives, and surrealist aesthetics establishing a visual language all his own.


Though best known for his color images, Bourdin launched his career in black and white in the early 1950s. Untouched explores this largely unseen work and gives insight into the early development of his photographic eye. The carefully constructed images, initially conceived as an exhibition series, reveal his artistic motivation years before he began working on assignments for French Vogue and Photo Femina. In both concept and composition, these photographs display his fascination with striking graphic layouts and narrative cinematic portraiture. Capturing people he encountered on the streets of Paris, Bourdin trained his eye to transcend the reality of the medium, developing a unique perspective through unconventional manipulations of the picture plane. Untouched is the first volume in a series of eight forthcoming books that explore the photographer’s complete works.



87. Mario de Janeiro Testino

Mario Testino is one of the world's most successful fashion and portrait photographers, whose images are noted for their freshness and intimacy. Peruvian by birth, Testino has been fascinated by Rio de Janeiro since his earliest summer vacations. When I was 14, on holiday, and going from my house to the beach and seeing everyone walk everywhere in their tiny bathing suits--the girls and boys were so sexy and carefree and wild--I just could not believe it.

This easy sensuality, sexual freedom and lust for life left a deep impression; Testino has been going back ever since, for work and fun, passion and inspiration. Featuring candid shots of exquisite cariocas baring nubile flesh, including supermodel Gisele Bündchen, MaRIO DE JANEIRO Testino captures the essence of this incomparably seductive city and its sultry citizens. From its breathtaking sunset panoramas, to the throbbing chaos of its world-famous carnival, this is Testino's love poem to the Brazilian metropolis that captured his teenage heart, and never let go.



88. Arnold Newman - One Hundred

Published to coincide with the centennial of Arnold Newman's birth, Arnold Newman: One Hundred offers a celebratory look at 100 of the photographer's most provocative and memorable images. Arnold Newman is widely renowned for pioneering and popularizing the environmental portrait. He placed his sitters in surroundings representative of their professions, aiming to capture the essence of an individual's life and work. Though this approach is commonplace today, his technique was highly unconventional in the 1930s when he began shooting his subjects. His environmental approach to portraiture was influenced by symbolism and impressionism, and defined by the imperative of captivating the viewer no matter how well known the subject was. While he specialized in photographing artists, Newman captured the likenesses of a vast range of figures, from athletes and actors to presidents and politicians, including Marlene Dietrich, John F. Kennedy, Harry S. Truman, Piet Mondrian, Pablo Picasso, Arthur Miller, Marilyn Monroe, Ronald Reagan, Mickey Mantle and Audrey Hepburn.



89. Arnold Newman: FO (Taschen's photobooks)

Piet Mondrian behind his easel, Igor Stravinsky at his piano, Max Ernst sitting smoking on his throne-like chair: Arnold Newman's photographs are classics of portraiture. His subtle arrangements constituted the foundations of "environmental portraiture." His photographs integrate the respective artist's characteristic equipment and surroundings, thus indicating his or her field of activity. The enormous fame of Newman's portraits can be ascribed to their daring compositions and sometimes astounding spatial structures. The photographer's beginnings, on the other hand, were none too promising. During the Great Depression Newman had to abandon his art studies for financial reasons. Between 1938 and 1942 he concentrated on socio-documentary photography in the ghettos of West Palm Beach, Philadelphia, and Baltimore. One might think that being forced to earn his living in a photography studio would have stifled his artistic potential: Newman portrayed up to 70 clients a day. Yet he still succeeded in developing a very personal touch and establishing himself in the New York art scene of the early 1940s. His subjects included Max Ernst, Marcel Duchamp, Marc Chagall, Jackson Pollock, Willem de Kooning and Alexander Calder. With his unmistakable style, Newman became the star photographer of artists, writers and musicians.



90. Marc Riboud: 60 Years of Photography

Marc Riboud traveled the world recording the harmony of landscapes and the beauty in faces from Angkor to Istanbul, India to Bangladesh, and New York to China. From a painter poised like a dancer on the metal girders of the Eiffel Tower to a young woman bravely facing down a rank of riflemen in protest against the Vietnam War, Riboud’s photographs reveal his deep insight into humanity, his compassion for the human struggle, and an insatiable desire to understand the plights, triumphs, and daily life of others. While many of his photographs depict the anguish of war, others catch the evanescent delight of a swim in a sun-dappled river or children learning to whistle in a Shanghai street. An exhibition of Riboud’s photography will open at New York’s Rubin Museum on October 17, 2014.



91. William Helburn: Seventh and Madison

William Helburn was the go-to photographer for many of the top advertising agencies in New York in the 1950s and 1960s. Shock value and an unrelenting hunger for success helped Helburn to a pioneer’s share in the revolutionary era of advertising and his work would also appear on the editorial pages and covers of major magazines. As well as cars and cosmetics, Helburn shot Coca-Cola, Canada Dry, whiskies, clothing lines, airlines, jewelry, cigars and cigarettes. He worked with the top models of the day, from Dovima and Dorian Leigh to Jean Patchett and Barbara Mullen, to Jean Shrimpton and Lauren Hutton. William Helburn: Seventh and Madison is the first book to survey Helburn’s work. It g